Borrowed from the Postural Restoration Institute (PRI,) this drill is fantastic in getting someone out of an anterior pelvic tilt – which can lead to back pain, hamstring strains and many other pathologies that look for an anteriorly tilted pelvis as a compensation strategy. Look for more posts to follow which show integration of this […]

Client w/major (R) knee pain. Think her (R) ankle has something to do with it? She also complains of constantly spraining it. Single limb stance testing shows reverse/supination strategy. Releasing the right medial ankle region followed up by right glute activation and left anterior oblique sling activation along with building neutral foot control in weight-bearing – knee feels like a boss! Don’t just treat the knee if the knee hurts!

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Now we know why we posteriorly tilt when we squat and round out our lower backs.  But how do we stretch the tight structures that create that “dumping out” effect?  There are 3 main muscle groups that contribute to this effect.  What are they?  Curious?  Well . . . You know what to do!

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So we know about the squat and what happens when we loose form on the bottom end (see last video.) We “dump out” at the pelvis. But why?  The answer lies in the length of the three main muscle groups.  1. Hamstrings  2. Glutes  3. Adductors.  If they are tight or in spasm, they will pull the pelvis into a posterior tilt or a “dump-out.”  Watch this video to understand what I’m talking about and take a look at your own squat.